Migrants from Africa, Asia and South America boost evangelism in Europe
Migrants from Africa, Asia and South America boost evangelism in Europe
(Photo: © Peter Kenny)Ethiopian Christians at a church service at the Ecumenical Center in Geneva, Switzerland in February 2017.

A new report from European Christian Mission finds that migrant Christians from South America, Asia and Africa are boosting evangelism in Europe.

Europe 2021 – A Missiological Report is authored by Jim Memory, a member of the ECM international leadership team and lecturer in European mission at All Nations Christian College in England, Christian Today reports.

“In many ways, Christianity is what made Europe,” says the report.

“No other continent has been exposed to Christianity for such a prolonged period and in such an extensive way,” it says.

“Yet just as Europe was the first continent to be Christianized, it was also the first to be de-Christianized.”

The 50-page document published in July seeks to address the major trends in Europe shaping the context for Christian mission in the continent.

‘CULTURAL CHRISTIANITY’

Memory writes: “Europe is perhaps the greatest challenge in world mission today. Most Europeans appear to have been inoculated against the Gospel by the vaccine of cultural Christianity.

“However, I believe the weakness of the Church is also God’s opportunity.

“More than ever before, European Christians are collaborating, networking, and planting churches together, and into that mix, God has brought the vitality of Christians from the Majority World.”

The report says Europe may be the greatest challenge in world mission today.

“Most Europeans appear to have been inoculated against the gospel by the vaccine of cultural Christianity,” writes Memory.

“However, I believe the weakness of the Church is also God’s opportunity. More than ever before, European Christians are collaborating, networking, and planting churches together, and into that mix, God has brought the vitality of Christians from the Majority World.”

He notes that Latin-American migrants have planted thousands of churches in Spain, Portugal and elsewhere over the last 30 years.

“It is difficult to find a major European city that does not have a large Spanish speaking and/or Brazilian congregation,” writes Memory.

Chinese churches “can be found almost everywhere,” he explains.

“The Chinese Overseas Christian Mission lists over 120 Chinese-speaking congregations in the UK and a further 150 in the rest of Europe, though that is certainly only a fraction of the actual churches that exist,” says Memory.

AFRICAN-INITIATED PENTECOSTAL CHURCHES IN UK

It is the black African churches that are the “most numerous,” with thousands of African-initiated Pentecostal churches in Britain alone, the report notes.

The Redeemed Christian Church of God has over 750 congregations today and is planting around 25 new churches in Britain every year. More churches belong to the Church of Pentecost, Christ Embassy and Christ Apostolic Tabernacle.

“If you have an African population in your city, there will almost certainly be an African diaspora church, even if you are not aware of it,” notes Memory.

The report outlines the how mission can face challenges due to de-Christianization of Europe over the last half millennium.

It says, “Of course, some parts of Africa and Asia saw Christianity become dominant and then lose that dominance to Islam long before any European country became thoroughly evangelized.

“The difference is, whereas during the first 1,500 years of Christian history, de-Christianization was the result of the loss of ‘Christian lands’ to invaders, the de-Christianization of Europe over the last 500 years has occurred from within.”

Memory writes at the end, “Nevertheless, the Parable of the Sower (Matt. 13; Mark 4; Luke 8) points to the importance of the soil (the context) for the reception of the gospel message and the propagation of the Kingdom of God.

“Though Europe’s soil today might appear arid and unyielding, the seed of the Kingdom is being sown and will produce fruit. Our task is to sow. (Galatians 6:9).”

Rev. Frank Hinkelmann, president of the European Evangelical Alliance says “Jim Memory’s missiological report starts by providing an excellent overview of the general and the spiritual context Christians are facing in Europe.”

He says it considers the COVID-19 pandemic, before moving on to trends in European mission and the implications for mission in Europe.

“This paper should be a must-read for all those interested in missions in and to Europe,” says Hinkelmann.

Langham Partnership’s Dr Chris Wright called the report “timely” and “essential reading for all those who, in any part of the world, are concerned about mission in, from and to, the continent of Europe”.

“Thoroughly documented from secular sources and theological expertise, this is the kind of resource that is increasingly needed for intelligent Christian engagement in our alarmingly changed world,” he said.

Rev Israel Oluwole Olofinjana, Director of the Evangelical Alliance’s One People Commission, said: “Reverse missionaries and indigenous missionaries will find this report very helpful for understanding the European scene in order to contextualise their mission.”

New idea to combat climate change: Planting trees across Europe will increase rainfall
New idea to combat climate change: Planting trees across Europe will increase rainfall

Planting additional trees to combat climate change across Europe could also increase rainfall, research shows. A new study has found that converting agricultural land into forest will increase average summer rains by 7.6%.

The authors believe that additional rain may partially offset the increase in dry conditions expected with climate change. The findings for increasing precipitation are based in part on observations of existing models.

But the main reasons are less clear – they are probably related to the way forests interact with cloudy air.

Tree planting has become a major part of many countries’ efforts to tackle climate change around the world. A number of studies have looked at the range of impacts, both positive and negative, that the planting boom is likely to bring. This new document examines the impact of the conversion of agricultural land across Europe into sustainable forests.

The authors use a statistical model based on observation to assess how changes in forest cover would affect rainfall across the continent. Researchers have found that if there is a 20% increase in forests, evenly across Europe, it will increase local rainfall, especially in winter and with a greater impact in coastal regions.

But like local rains, planting new forests also affects the wind. Scientists have found that rainfall in these places has increased, especially during the summer months. Taking the two impacts together, in what the team describes as a realistic reforestation scenario, they found that overall rainfall increased by 7.6% over the summer.

This is a very important finding, according to lead author Ronnie Meyer of ETH Zurich. This also has implications for climate change.

“Probably the most threatening signal of climate change that we expect in terms of rainfall is the reduction in summer rainfall that is expected in the southern parts of Europe, such as the Mediterranean. According to our study, afforestation is likely to be very useful in terms of adapting to the adverse effects of climate change, “he told BBC News.

But the authors also point out that increased rainfall could have a potential negative impact, especially in the Atlantic region. The authors say the reasons for these local and remote effects on rainfall are uncertain and point out that rain-producing clouds tend to linger longer over forested areas.

“Planting trees is certainly not a quick fix for climate change. The addition of new trees or the restoration of lost forests can never compensate for greenhouse gas emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. First of all, we need to stop generating these emissions, “said Professor Wim Thierry of the Free University of Brussels, Belgium, who was not involved in the new study.

“But reducing our emissions will not be enough: we will also have to actively remove carbon from the atmosphere if we want to stay below 1.5 ° C for warming. “From this point of view, planting trees is emerging as a potential candidate for generating these negative emissions, but planting trees should never be an excuse not to take any action to reduce our carbon emissions,” he concluded.

Adidas presented the world’s first shoes made of mushroom‘ leather

Adidas are quite active in experimenting with new technologies. The company has now officially introduced Stan Smith Mylo. These are the first sports shoes to use Mylo – a material derived from mushrooms, which resembles natural leather. Its soft and elastic structure is a suitable solution for creating sneakers that are also more environmentally friendly.

Mylo is produced from renewable mycelium by means of highly efficient growth of the underground roots of the fungus, which takes about two weeks. Adidas specialists take advantage of modern vertical farming techniques that allow the mycelium to be grown in a system that increases production per square centimeter.

The conceptual model is another product that is being developed with the idea of ​​being harmless to nature. The use of Mylo material is possible in the outer upper part, the perforated stripes, as well as in the heel cover.

The midsole of the shoe is made of natural rubber, inform BusinessInsider and Digital.

The new concept is possible thanks to a unique and joint partnership with Bolt Threads – a biotechnology company committed to creating the next generation of advanced materials. The creation of Stan Smith Mylo is the best proof of a technology that is expected to be realized in many new products in the near future.

Cooperation is based on environmental commitments and demonstrates a long-term commitment to a more sustainable future, through serious investment in material innovation and creative solutions to ensure. In this way, companies ensure that the material is harmless to the planet, but contributes to the sporty look of the shoe.

How to turn the toilet into a cache

With the use of a toilet, you can pay for your coffee or buy bananas at a university in South Korea, where human waste is used to power a building.

Dr Cho Jai Won, a professor of urban and environmental engineering at the National Institute of Science and Technology in Ulsan (UNIST), has designed an environmentally friendly toilet connected to a laboratory that uses excrement to produce biogas and manure, Straitstimes reported.

The BeeVi waterless toilet uses a vacuum pump to send the faeces into an underground tank. There, microorganisms break down the waste into methane, which becomes a source of energy for the building, feeding a gas stove, a hot water boiler and a solid oxide fuel cell.

“If we think out of the box, faeces have a valuable value to produce energy and manure. I invested this value in ecological circulation “, Dr. Cho told about the innovation.

The average person defecates about 500 grams a day, which can be converted into 50 liters of methane, the environmental engineer estimates. This gas can generate 0.5kWh of electricity or be used to drive a car for about 1.2 km. To stimulate the use of the eco-toilet, Dr. Cho has created a virtual currency called Ggool, which means honey in Korean. Everyone who uses the eco-toilet earns 10 Ggool per day.

Students can use the currency to buy goods on campus – from freshly brewed coffee to a cup of instant noodles, fruit and books. Students can also pick up the products they want from a store and pay with Ggool by scanning a QR code.

“I used to think that feces was dirty, but now it’s a treasure of great value to me,” graduate student Heo Hui-jin told Ggool.

Four companies recruited mercenaries to assassinate Haitian president: details
Four companies recruited mercenaries to assassinate Haitian president: details

Murder suspects Colombians traveled to Haiti in two groups via the Dominican Republic

Four companies were involved in recruiting people suspected of assassinating Haitian President Jovenel Moise.

The Associated Press informs about this with reference to the head of the National Police of Colombia, Jorge Luis Vargas Valencia.

True, he did not reveal the names of the companies, saying that at this moment the information received was being checked.

He said that the suspected Colombians, including former military personnel, traveled to Haiti in two groups through the Dominican Republic. The first group, in which there are two suspects, arrived from Colombia to Panama on May 6, later to the Dominican Republic and then to Haiti. A second group of 11 suspects arrived in the Dominican Republic and two days later ended up in Haiti.

In turn, the detained Americans said that the attack was organized by a foreigner “Mike”, who speaks Spanish and English, and that their goal was to arrest the president “on the warrant of the investigating judge.”

And one of the Americans even said that he “found this job on the Internet” and arrived in Haiti a month ago, and before that he worked as a security guard at the Canadian Embassy.

Let’s remind:

• Haitian President Jovenel Moise was shot dead on the night of 7 July. At about one in the morning, a group of unknown persons attacked his residence and shot the president. In addition, the country’s first lady received a gunshot wound.

• The Minister for Voting and Inter-Party Relations, Matthias Pierre, stated that at least 26 people were involved in the murder of Moise.

• Also involved in the assassination of the President of Haiti are retired Colombian military personnel.

• It is now known that after the murder of Moiz, law enforcement officers killed three mercenaries, 15 Colombians and the Americans are now in custody, but several more members of the group are still looking for.

The US will think about how to help Haiti.

Haitian authorities have called on the United States of America to send American troops to the country to protect key infrastructure in the aftermath of the assassination of President Jovenel Moise.

This is reported by The New York Times with reference to the Minister for Voting and Inter-Party Relations of Haiti, Matthias Pierre.

Meanwhile, in Haiti, after the assassination of the president, there is political chaos and street riots, as well as a health crisis in the country, which is caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

The request for military assistance was voiced because earlier US President Joe Biden and Secretary of State Anthony Blinken promised to help Haiti. But State Department deputy spokeswoman Jalina Porter said she could confirm such a request.

The United States will promptly send senior FBI and Department of Homeland Security officials to Haiti to determine how to help the country after the assassination of the president.

(Video) Iran’s Regime Remains Committed to the Fatwa Behind Its 1988 Massacre
(Video) Iran’s Regime Remains Committed to the Fatwa Behind Its 1988 Massacre

(PMOI / MEK Iran) and (NCRI): Ebrahim Raisi has played a key role in a historic massacre of political prisoners, serving on the “death commission” tasked with implementing then Supreme leader Rohullah Khomeini’s fatwa against the main opposition, the MEK.

June 16, 2021 - Ebrahim Raisi, a member of the 1988 Massacre’s “Death Commission” assigned as the highest judicial position within the regime.

(PMOI / MEK Iran) and (NCRI): Ebrahim Raisi, a member of the 1988 Massacre’s “Death Commission” assigned as the highest judicial position within the regime.

June 17, 2021 - Iranian people are ripping posters of Ebrahim Raisi, the leading candidate for the regime’s sham presidential election.

(PMOI / MEK Iran) and (NCRI): Iranian people are ripping posters of Ebrahim Raisi, the leading candidate for the regime’s sham presidential election.

June 21, 2021 - Iranian regime’s supreme leader Ali Khamenei and Ebrahim Raisi.

(PMOI / MEK Iran) and (NCRI): Iranian regime’s supreme leader Ali Khamenei and Ebrahim Raisi.

June 21, 2021 - Ebrahim Raisis record oppression of women.

(PMOI / MEK Iran) and (NCRI): Ebrahim Raisis record oppression of women.

June 21, 2021 - Ebrahim Raisi, a member of the 1988 Massacre’s “Death Commission” assigned as the highest judicial position within the regime.

(PMOI / MEK Iran) and (NCRI): Ebrahim Raisi, a member of the 1988 Massacre’s “Death Commission” assigned as the highest judicial position within the regime.

June 23, 2021 - Ebrahim Raisi, a member of the 1988 Massacre’s “Death Commission” assigned as the highest judicial position within the regime.

(PMOI / MEK Iran) and (NCRI): Ebrahim Raisi, a member of the 1988 Massacre’s “Death Commission” assigned as the highest judicial position within the regime.

July 30, 2021 - Iran - Activities of defiant youths and MEK Supporters commemorating 33rd Anniversary of the 1988 Massacre.

(PMOI / MEK Iran) and (NCRI): Iran – Activities of defiant youths and MEK Supporters commemorating 33rd Anniversary of the 1988 Massacre.

Khomeini’s fatwa: any political prisoners who “remain steadfast in their support for the MEK are waging war on God and are condemned to execution.”

Ebrahim Raisi, the man who had been appointed to lead the Judiciary in 2019 by Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, as part of an ongoing series of rewards for those who helped to carry out the 1988 massacre.”
— NCRI

PARIS, FRANCE, July 31, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — The National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), reported that on June 18, the Iranian regime appointed a notorious violator of human rights as its next president. Ebrahim Raisi has played a key role in a historic massacre of political prisoners, serving on the “death commission” tasked with implementing then Supreme leader Rohullah Khomeini’s fatwa against the main opposition, the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK).The MEK was the prime target of the massacre between July and September of 1988, and it comprised the overwhelming majority of 30,000 political prisoners who were massacred during that period.

The death toll has naturally never been confirmed by Iranian authorities. Indeed, they have made every effort to cover up the details of the massacre in the ensuing three decades, by paving over and building upon the mass graves in which many victims are secretly interred. But contemporary evidence, including communications among the regime officials, make the MEK’s own estimates inherently plausible.

On July 31, 1988, with the massacre in full swing, Hossein Ali Montazeri, then the heir to the supreme leader, wrote to Khomeini in order to protest the indiscriminate nature of the killings, both on moral grounds and on the grounds that continuing along that path would inevitably foster greater resentment against the clerical regime both at home and abroad. In that letter, Montazeri appealed to the supreme leader to at least direct death commissions to “spare women with children.” He then suggested that in absence of such restraint, the effects of the ongoing proceedings could include “the execution of several thousand prisoners in a few days.”

This appears to be exactly what happened in the wake of Khomeini’s decision to ignore the first letter and then reply to a follow-up by writing only, “I am religiously responsible for the said verdict. You should not be concerned. May God obliterate every one of the MEK.” This remark was hardly more extreme than the language of the fatwa itself, which decreed that any political prisoners who “remain steadfast in their support for the MEK are waging war on God and are condemned to execution.”

The fatwa concluded by stating that it is “naïve to show mercy” to its targets and that the bodies tasked with carrying out the executions “must not hesitate, nor show any doubt or be concerned about details” of the decree’s implementation. This point was reiterated in Khomeini’s reply to an early request for clarification from Chief Justice Moussavi Ardebili.

Whereas the head of the judiciary questioned whether capital punishment should be meted out to persons who had already received lesser sentences and had committed no further crime, the supreme leader merely commanded Ardebili to “annihilate the enemies of Islam immediately,” then declared that in each individual case, the judiciary’s procedure should be whatever most “speeds up the implementation of the verdict.”

Khomeini’s letters to Ardebili and Montazeri directly contradict the descriptions of the proceedings that some Iranian officials have offered in recent years. In an interview with Fars News on August 4, 2016, for instance, a judiciary official named Ali Razini insisted that all of the executions were justified not just on the basis of the defendants’ membership in the MEK but also on the basis of unspecified crimes.

While Razini acknowledged that many prisoners were executed in the summer of 1988 after serving out lesser sentences, he proceeded to claim that all of them were guilty of “new crimes” either committed while in prison or committed earlier and discovered after the fact.

By all accounts, most regime authorities believed that any statement or the mere suggestion of continued support for the MEK was, in effect, a “new crime.” In one of his letters from the time of the massacre, Montazeri pointed out that some political prisoners had been asked to condemn the MEK and to affirm their willingness to fight in the war with Iraq, and had complied in both cases.

But some were then confronted with follow-up questions about whether they would be willing to walk through minefields on behalf of the supreme leader. Anything less than enthusiastic acceptance of that scenario was generally deemed to be evidence that the subject was still holding onto MEK political beliefs, and was grounds for execution.

In July 2017, Ali Fallahian, Iran’s Intelligence Minister in the period immediately following the massacre, gave an interview with state television in which he defended other, similarly arbitrary statements and behaviors that were deemed by the death commissions to be justification for capital punishment.

When challenged by the interviewer about whether anyone had been killed simply for being in possession of a MEK newspaper at the time of their arrest, Fallahian proudly answered in the affirmative. Such reading material, he explained, meant that the person in question was “part of that organization” and thus part of the population targeted by the fatwa.

The former Intelligence Minister went on to say that even buying bread to share with MEK activists could be grounds for execution. Such statements should leave no doubt about the fact that the 1988 massacre was specifically intended to wipe out the country’s leading Resistance group in its entirety. Then again, there should never have been any doubt on this point, since that intention was made clear by the fatwa itself, and especially by Khomeini’s follow-ups to it.

Even though the regime has attempted to cover-up the details of the massacre, officials have never been overly cautious about acknowledging its true intentions. Whatever caution they did hold seems to have evaporated since 2016, the year Montazeri’s son released an audio recording of the late ayatollah’s 1988 conversation with the members of the “death commission”, in which he condemned their participation in the “worst crime of the Islamic Republic.”

In August of that year, an official statement by the regime’s Assembly of Experts praised Khomeini’s fatwa for being “decisive and uncompromising” and for supposedly bringing the MEK “to the brink of complete annihilation.” Mostafa Pourmohammadi, then Iran’s Justice Minister and a former member of the death commissions himself, told state media that it was “God’s command” for the MEK to be executed and that those who carried out the mass killings were “proud” to do so.

The following month, the fatwa’s assertion that MEK members were “enemies of God” was reiterated by Ahmad Jannati, the head of the Guardian Council. Religious duty, he argued, “commands that we amputate their hands and legs, exile them, hang them.”

The Guardian Council would go on, in 2021, to exercise its vetting power in order to remove all viable candidates for the Iranian presidency other than Ebrahim Raisi, the man who had been appointed to lead the Judiciary in 2019 by Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, as part of an ongoing series of rewards for those who helped to carry out the 1988 massacre.

Raisi’s ascension to the presidency reinforces the culture of impunity surrounding the 1988 massacre and other crimes against humanity, but it also threatens to bring even more attention to the massacre than Montazeri’s recording did in 2016. However, it is the moral and humanitarian responsibility of the international community to respond in a more assertive and coordinated fashion this time around, so as to bring accountability to Iran’s new president, Ebrahim Raisi, and those who have faced no consequences for this crime after more than 30 years.

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p class=”contact c9″ dir=”auto”>Shahin Gobadi
NCRI
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Alliance for Public Awareness – ICE 1988 Massacre of Political Prisoners In Iran – A Crime Against Humanity