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“Woke” is a religion.  That’s been affirmatively determined by dozens of smart observers, including New York magazine columnist Andrew Sullivan.  He recently described what he called “the cult of social justice, whose followers show the same zeal as any born-again Evangelical.  They are filling the void that Christianity once owned[.]”

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While Sullivan and many other commentators have pointed to certain failings in the theology of Wokeism, none has put his finger on the most important issue.  Simply put, there are good religions and there are bad religions.


There are three specific elements that when found in any given religion greatly increase the likelihood that its practice will lead to human flourishing.


All of the great religions share, for example, the Golden Rule, most often expressed in Christian tradition as “do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”  In the Quran, Muhammad says, “not one of you truly believes until you wish for others what you wish for yourself.”  The Hindus call it the sum of duty: “Do not do to others what would cause pain if done to you.”  (Do all of the faithful follow these rules?  No.  Not even close.  But it’s there.)